Their Dystopia Our Reality!

Just finished watching this dystopian Netflix series Leila that follows the life of an upper-class Brahman woman married to an upper-class Ashraf Muslim man in a Hindoo Pakistan.
The series tries to showcase the horrors of a Manuwadi regime inflicted upon the masses of the Indian subcontinent.
But if this Manuwadi dream is actualized who’d suffer the most: the Bahujan men, the Bahujan women or some rich Brahman Woman?
This series tries to capture various social conditions including communalism, pollution, poverty, water scarcity and totalitarianism.
But why carefully choose to neglect caste apartheid which has turned out to be so effective in keeping 90% population subjected and hence aiding the ruling class to appropriate surplus labour with such efficient way that even the Turks invaders wished to introduce such system in Islam.
Why’d the ruling class of a dystopian time that’s devoid of resources, not use casteism to secure its privileges?
Threats of communalism is carefully given the most important in the entire series to undermine the gravity of casteism.
This whole series seems to a reflection of the fears of the rich liberal Savarna class about what would happen to them in an extremist Manuwadi regime: they won’t be able to mingle with people of their own class/caste from different religion, eat meat or drink wine or listen to Faiz or will be targeted for their identity and ideologies or won’t have enough water or be forced to live in polluted environment or their women will be forced to be more homely and religious.
Take a good look at the lives of Dalits, Backwards and Aboriginals: the dystopia your entitled Savarna ass fears is already upon us.

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